Delhi Travel Gurudwara Bangla Sahib

Gurudwara Bangla Sahib

Gurudwara Bangla Sahib is one of world famous gurudwara located in delhi. Gurudwara Bangla Sahib is located near connaught Place, New Delhi on Baba Kharak Singh Marg. Gurudwara Bangla Sahib is instantly recognizable by its golden dome & tall flagpole { Nishan Sahib }. Gurudawara Bangla Sahib is dedicated to Guru Har Kishan Ji. Sikhism is one of world’s largest community in world. There are total 10 guru’s of sikhs.

Gurudwara Bangla Sahib
Delhi Travel Explore Shri Gurudwara Bangla Sahib


Delhi is approximately 573 Sq Miles in area. Lots of crowd daily visited here for their jobs. Temperature of this city is always fluctuating in summer and winter. Delhi is now divided in to two parts Purani Delhi & New Delhi. At the time of great epic “Mahabharat” this city is then known as Inderprastha.  

Gurdwara Bangla Sahib was originally a bungalow belonging to Raja Jai Singh, an Indian ruler in the seventeenth century, and was known as Jaisinghpura Palace, in Jaisingh Pura, an historic neighbourhood demolished to make way for the Connaught Place, shopping district.

The eighth Sikh Guru, Guru Har Krishan resided here during his stay in Delhi in 1664. During that time, there was a smallpox and cholera epidemic, and Guru Har Krishan helped the suffering by giving aid and fresh water from the well at this house.

Delhi Travel
Gurudwara Bangla Sahib
Delhi Famous Gurudwara Bangala Sahib
Inside View

Soon he too contracted the illness and eventually died on 30 March 1664. A small tank was later constructed by Raja Jai Singh over the well, its water is now revered as having healing properties and is taken by Sikhs throughout the world back to their homes.The Gurdwara and its Sarovar are now a place of great reverence for Sikhs, and a place for special congregation on birth anniversary of Guru Har Krishan.

The grounds include the Gurudwara, a kitchen, a large (holy) pond, a school and an art gallery. As with all Sikh Gurdwaras, the concept of langar is practiced, and all people, regardless of race or religion may eat in the Gurdwara kitchen (langar hall). The Langar (food) is prepared by gursikhs who work there and also by volunteers who like to help out.

At the Gurdwara, visitors are requested to cover their hair and not to wear shoes. Assistance to foreigners and visitors with Guides, head scarves, and shoe-minding service can be found inside the compound and are available free of charge. Anyone can volunteer to help keep the shoes in the shoe-minding room, and cleaning the precincts of the Gurudwara.

The complex also houses a higher secondary school, Baba Baghel Singh Museum, a library and a hospital. The Gurudwara and Langar Hall are now air-conditioned. A new “Yatri Niwas”, and multi-level parking space have been constructed. Toilet facilities are available. The space around the back entrance to the Gurudwara is also being spruced up, so as to give a better view from the roadside.

Guru Sahib Shri Har Kishan Ji

He was the eighth of the ten Sikh Gurus. He well known as Bal guru because at the age of 5 years, he became the youngest Guru in Sikhism on 7 October 1661,succeeding his father, Guru Har Rai. He contracted smallpox and died of the disease in 1664 before reaching his 8th birthday.

Guru Maharaj Ji was born in Kiratpur in northwest Indian subcontinent to Krishen Devi and Guru Har Rai. His father, Guru Har Rai supported the moderate Sufi influenced Dara Shikoh instead of conservative Sunni influenced Aurangzeb as the two brothers entered into a war of succession to the Mughal Empire throne. After Aurangzeb won the succession war in 1658, he summoned Guru Har Rai in 1660 to explain his support for the executed Dara Shikoh. Guru Har Rai sent his elder son Ram Rai to represent him.

Aurangzeb kept the 13 year old Ram Rai as hostage, questioned Ram Rai about a verse in the Adi Granth – the holy text of Sikhs. Aurangzeb claimed that it disparaged the Muslims. Ram Rai changed the verse to appease Aurangzeb instead of standing by the Sikh scripture, an act for which Guru Har Rai excommunicated his elder son, and nominated the younger Har Krishan to succeed as the next Guru of Sikhism. Aurangzeb meanwhile rewarded Ram Rai, patronizing him with land grants in Dehra Dun region of the Himalayas.

A few years after Guru Har Krishan assumed the role of Sikh leader, Aurangzeb summoned the young Guru to his court, with an apparent plan to replace him with his elder brother Ram Rai as the Sikh Guru. However, Har Rai contracted smallpox when he arrived in Delhi and his meeting with Aurangzeb was cancelled. On his deathbed, Har Krishan said, “Baba Bakale”, and died in 1664.

The Sikh religious organization interpreted those words to mean that the next Guru is to be found in Bakale village, which they identified as Guru Tegh Bahadur, the ninth Guru of Sikhism. Authentic literature with more details about Guru Har Krishan’s life and times are scarce and not well recorded. Some of biographies about Guru Har Krishan, particularly about who his mother was, were written in the 18th century such as by Kesar Singh Chhibber, as well as in the 19th century, and these are highly inconsistent.