Parvati Valley | Adventure Traveling – AmazingShining

Parvati Valley | Adventure Traveling

Parvati Valley is majestic beautiful. It is one of major attractions in Himachal Pradesh. It is located 112 miles North East of Shimla in Kullu district. From the confluence of the Parvati River with the River Beas. It
runs eastwards, through a steep-sided valley from the town of Bhuntar, in the Kullu district of Himachal Pradesh in Northern India. From here, the road passes through the Sikh and Hindu pilgrimage town of Manikaran and terminates at Pulga. It is world famous for adventure traveling.

Parvati Valley
Himachal Travel

Parvati Valley

Parvati Valley easily attracts any one who love & support nature.
According to legend, here bridges were created by the massive strength of the Pandava brothers. From Pandupul, the wide valley of the upper Parvati valley climbs gradually through the wide, high-altitude meadowland of Odi Thatch to the sacred site of Mantalai Lake (4100m), the source of the Parvati River. Continuing east from Mantalai lake, it is possible to cross the Pin Parvati Pass (5319m) into the Pin Valley National Park and on to the Mudh village in the Lahul and Spiti district of Himachal Pradesh.

Parvati River

Parvati Valley is just amazing. The parvati river is a river in the Parvati Valley in Himachal Pradesh, northern India that flows into the Beas River at Bhuntar, some 10 km south of Kullu. It rises from the Man Talai Glacier below the Pin Parbati pass.

Parvati Valley Malana Village

While travel Parvati Valley must visit this village. It is situated on a remote plateau by the side of the torrential Malana river, at a height of 2,652 metres above sea level. A new road has shortened the walking time from several days to just 4 hours. The Hydro Malana Project has also ruined the beauty of the valley. In 2004, Malana was adopted by Aryan Sharma, a businessman based in Delhi. On 5 January 2008, a raging fire in the village, which burnt for more than 5 hours, destroyed cultural structures and parts of ancient temples located in the village.

Parvati Valley Manikaran

It is one of most beautiful place of Parvati Valley.
It is a pilgrimage centre for Hindus and Sikhs. The Hindus believe that Manu recreated human life in Manikaran after the flood, making it a sacred area. It has many temples and a gurudwara. According to the Sikhs, during third Udasi, the founder of Sikhism Guru Nanak came to this place in 15 Asu 1574 Bikrami with his disciple Bhai Mardana. Mardana felt hungry and they had no food. Guru Nanak sent Mardana to collect food for the langar.

The legend of Manikaran states that while roaming around, Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati, once chanced upon a place that was surrounded by mountains and was lush green. Enamoured by the beauty of the place, they decided to spend some time there. It is believed that they actually spent eleven hundred years here. From Kheerganga to the site of Tunda Bhuj village (3285m) the Parvati Valley cuts a steep-sided gorge through the mountains and as the altitude increases, the thick, coniferous forest gradually makes way for patches of meadowland scattered with boulders.

Few Intro About Kullu Valley

Parvati valley is closer to kullu. So here is few things to know about kullu. The name Kullu derives from the word “Kulant Peeth”, meaning “end of the habitable world”. As per legends, during the Great Flood, Manu visited this valley, but was unable to cross the Rohtang pass. He named the last settlement he found as Kulant Peeth, and chose to settle and meditate in what has now become the town of Manali (Manu’s Place). The name further devolved into “Kulut”, as the kingdom was known for a long time; before finally being known by the current name of Kullu or Kulu.

The Buddhist pilgrim monk Xuanzang visited the Kullu Valley in 634 or 635 CE. He described it as a fertile region completely surrounded by mountains, about 3,000 li in circuit, with a capital 14 or 15 li in circumference. There were some twenty Buddhist monasteries, with about 1,000 monks, most of whom were Mahayanist. There were also some fifteen Hindu temples, and people of both faiths lived mixed together. Kullu got its first motorable access only after Indian Independence. The long centuries of seclusion have, however, allowed the area to retain a considerable measure of its traditional charm.

4 replies on “Parvati Valley | Adventure Traveling”

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: