Tamarind Sauce Recipe

Sweet Tamarind Sauce


Indian food is awesome in taste & mouthwatering. There are lots of flavours of sauces in world; sweet tamarind sauce is one of most famous healthy indian sauce. Before sharing the recipe of sweet tamarind sauce we are guiding you some important things about it. Tamarind is a leguminous tree in the family Fabaceae indigenous to tropical Africa. The genus Tamarindus is a monotypic taxon. It’s tree produces pod-like fruit that contains an edible pulp used in cuisines around the world. Other uses of the pulp include traditional medicine and metal polish.

The wood can be used for woodworking and tamarind seed oil can be extracted from the seeds. Its leaves are used in Indian cuisine, especially in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. Because of tamarind’s many uses, it is cultivated around the world in tropical and subtropical zones.

Several early medieval herbalists and physicians wrote Tamar Indi, medieval Latin use was Tamarindus, and Marco Polo wrote of tamarandi. In Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Italy, Spain, and throughout the Lusosphere, it is called tamarindo. In those countries, it is often used to make the beverage of the same name. In the Caribbean, tamarind is sometimes called tamón.

The tamarind is a long-lived, medium-growth tree, which attains a maximum crown height of 12 to 18 meters (39 to 59 ft). The crown has an irregular, vase-shaped outline of dense foliage. The tree grows well in full sun. It prefers clay, loam, sandy, and acidic soil types, with high resistance to drought and aerosol salt.

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Tamarind

Thailand has the largest plantations of the ASEAN nations, followed by Indonesia, Myanmar, and the Philippines. In parts of Southeast Asia, tamarind is called asam. It is cultivated all over India, especially in Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, Karnataka, Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, and Tamil Nadu. Extensive tamarind orchards in India produce 275,500 tons (250,000 MT) annually.

In the United States, it is a large-scale crop introduced for commercial use, second in net production quantity only to India, mainly in the southern states, notably South Florida and as a shade tree, along roadsides, in dooryards, and in parks. A traditional food plant in Africa, tamarind has the potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development and support sustainable landcare.

In Madagascar, its fruit and leaves are a well-known favorite of the ring-tailed lemur, providing as much as 50 percent of their food resources during the year if available. Tamarind lumber is used to make furniture, carvings, turned objects such as mortars and pestles, chopping blocks, and other small specialty wood items. Tamarind heartwood is reddish brown, sometimes with a purplish hue. The heartwood in tamarind tends to be narrow and is usually only present in older and larger trees.

The pale yellow sapwood is sharply demarcated from the heartwood. Heartwood is said to be durable to very durable in decay resistance, and is also resistant to insects. Its sapwood is not durable and is prone to attack by insects and fungi as well as spalting. Due to its density and interlocked grain, tamarind is considered difficult to work. Heartwood has a pronounced blunting effect on cutting edges. Tamarind turns, glues, and finishes well. The heartwood is able to take a high natural polish.

What is Sauce ?

In cooking a sauce is a liquid, cream, or semi-solid food served on or used in preparing other foods. Sauces are not normally consumed by themselves; they add flavor, moisture, and visual appeal to a dish. Sauce is a French word taken from the Latin salsa, meaning salted. Possibly the oldest recorded European sauce is garum, the fish sauce used by the Ancient Greeks; while doubanjiang, the Chinese soybean paste is mentioned in Rites of Zhou in the 3rd century BC. Sauces need a liquid component. Sauces are an essential element in cuisines all over the world. Sauces may be used for sweet or savory dishes.

They may be prepared and served cold, like mayonnaise, prepared cold but served lukewarm like pesto, cooked and served warm like bechamel or cooked and served cold like applesauce. They may be freshly prepared by the cook, especially in restaurants, but today many sauces are sold premade and packaged like Worcestershire sauce, HP Sauce, soy sauce or ketchup. Sauces for salad are called salad dressing. Sauces made by deglazing a pan are called pan sauces.

Sauces used in traditional Japanese cuisine are usually based on shōyu (soy sauce), miso or dashi. Ponzu, citrus-flavored soy sauce, and yakitori no tare, sweetened rich soy sauce, are examples of shōyu-based sauces. Miso-based sauces include gomamiso, miso with ground sesame, and amamiso, sweetened miso. In modern Japanese cuisine, the word “sauce” often refers to Worcestershire sauce, introduced in the 19th century and modified to suit Japanese tastes. Tonkatsu, okonomiyaki, and yakisoba sauces are based on this sauce. Japanese sauce or wasabi sauce is used on sushi and sashimi or mixed with soy sauce to make wasabi-joyu.

In traditional British cuisine, gravy is a sauce used on roast dinner. The sole survivor of the medieval bread-thickened sauces, bread sauce is one of the oldest sauces in British cooking. Apple sauce, mint sauce and horseradish sauce are used on meat. Redcurrant jelly, mint jelly, and white sauce may also be used. Salad cream is sometimes used on salads. Ketchup and brown sauce are used on fast-food type dishes. Strong English mustard is also used on various foods, as is Worcestershire sauce. Custard is a popular dessert sauce.

Other popular sauces include mushroom sauce, marie rose sauce, whisky sauce, Albert sauce and cheddar sauce. In contemporary British cuisine, owing to the wide diversity of British society today, there are also many sauces that are of British origin but based upon the cuisine of other countries, particularly former colonies such as India.Sauces in French cuisine date back to the Middle Ages. There were many hundreds of sauces in the culinary repertoire. In cuisine classique, sauces were a major defining characteristic of French cuisine.

Recipe Instructions

Ingredients:

Water

Sugar or Jaggery Powder as need

Black Salt as need

1/2 Tsp Fennel Powder

1/2 Cup Seedless Tamarind

1/2 Tsp Dry Ginger Powder

1/2 Tsp Cumin Powder

1/4 Tsp Red Chilli Powder

1/4 Tsp Garam Masala

Indian Sweet Tamarind Sauce
Tamarind Sauce

Preparations:

First we wash the Tamarind 4 times then soak in 4 cups of Water for 15-20 minutes. Add the Red Chilli Powder. Bring to a boil. Simmer for 4 minutes. Remove from heat.

Strain then mash well & add Dry Ginger Powder, Sugar / Jaggery, Cumin Powder, Garam Masala, Fennel Powder & Black Salt. Simmer till thick then remove from heat. Wait till cool. Sauce is ready to use.

5 Replies to “Tamarind Sauce Recipe”

  1. So what type of food would you use this on? And how is the taste? I know you said it is sweet but does it have a “bite” to it, is it smooth, will it keep well? Just things like that. Thank you and may God bless and be gracious!

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